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Limited 180gm vinyl LP pressing including digital download. There is an extended gap in Sonny Rollins' discography between 1959 and 1962 in which he voluntarily decided not to play in public. No recordings exist from this period after the private tapes that were made during his March 1959 European tour. His subsequent recordings were the January-February 1962 sessions that would produce the album the Bridge. This marked the first of Rollins' legendary musical sabbaticals. Critical reception to the Bridge, which was not the revolutionary new jazz approach many expected, was mixed. Rollins, who had been considered groundbreaking in his thematic improvisations, was supplanted in critical buzz by the growing popularity of Ornette Coleman's free jazz. However, if not a tremendous departure from Rollins' earlier style, the album was nevertheless quite successful. He would record a second studio album during this period in April 1962. In July of the same year he would be professionally taped at the Village Gate in New York. The recordings, which were issued under the title of Our Man in Jazz, marked the first existing testimonies of Rollins' collaboration with Don Cherry, with whom he would often play in the early sixties. This album is presented here featuring on the cover David McLane's classic photo showing Sonny at the very Williamsburg Bridge.
Limited 180gm vinyl LP pressing including digital download. There is an extended gap in Sonny Rollins' discography between 1959 and 1962 in which he voluntarily decided not to play in public. No recordings exist from this period after the private tapes that were made during his March 1959 European tour. His subsequent recordings were the January-February 1962 sessions that would produce the album the Bridge. This marked the first of Rollins' legendary musical sabbaticals. Critical reception to the Bridge, which was not the revolutionary new jazz approach many expected, was mixed. Rollins, who had been considered groundbreaking in his thematic improvisations, was supplanted in critical buzz by the growing popularity of Ornette Coleman's free jazz. However, if not a tremendous departure from Rollins' earlier style, the album was nevertheless quite successful. He would record a second studio album during this period in April 1962. In July of the same year he would be professionally taped at the Village Gate in New York. The recordings, which were issued under the title of Our Man in Jazz, marked the first existing testimonies of Rollins' collaboration with Don Cherry, with whom he would often play in the early sixties. This album is presented here featuring on the cover David McLane's classic photo showing Sonny at the very Williamsburg Bridge.
8436542017053
Sonny Rollins - Bridge

Details

Format: Vinyl
Label: IMT
Rel. Date: 12/02/2014
UPC: 8436542017053

Bridge
Artist: Sonny Rollins
Format: Vinyl
New: Ships out from warehouse in 3-5 days $20.01
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Limited 180gm vinyl LP pressing including digital download. There is an extended gap in Sonny Rollins' discography between 1959 and 1962 in which he voluntarily decided not to play in public. No recordings exist from this period after the private tapes that were made during his March 1959 European tour. His subsequent recordings were the January-February 1962 sessions that would produce the album the Bridge. This marked the first of Rollins' legendary musical sabbaticals. Critical reception to the Bridge, which was not the revolutionary new jazz approach many expected, was mixed. Rollins, who had been considered groundbreaking in his thematic improvisations, was supplanted in critical buzz by the growing popularity of Ornette Coleman's free jazz. However, if not a tremendous departure from Rollins' earlier style, the album was nevertheless quite successful. He would record a second studio album during this period in April 1962. In July of the same year he would be professionally taped at the Village Gate in New York. The recordings, which were issued under the title of Our Man in Jazz, marked the first existing testimonies of Rollins' collaboration with Don Cherry, with whom he would often play in the early sixties. This album is presented here featuring on the cover David McLane's classic photo showing Sonny at the very Williamsburg Bridge.
        
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